This week we have Pi Day and St. Patrick’s Day! I’m trying the whole cook-festively thing, even though I work odd hours this week and I once again was probably a tad ambitious with my recipes. I almost wrote ‘overly’ ambitious, but I think I can handle it. I think you can handle it, too.

[ source ]

[ source ]

monday.
vegan shepherd’s ‘pi’ for pi day! With some chicken on the side for Liam.

prep ahead: I think I’m going to try to make this whole thing ahead of time, possibly even on Sunday; if my schedule weren’t so weird, I would probably try to assemble the casserole and simply bake it before serving.

tuesday.
greeny chickpea salad, though probably with whatever veggies look good when I go shopping. I might add some kind of burger or seared salmon for Liam.

prep ahead: I’m going to roast the chickpeas and make the dressing a day or two before so that all I really need to do is assemble everything when I get home that night, and possibly cook up some chicken/turkey/salmon/etc. for Liam.

thursday.
green edamame burgers on Irish soda bread buns! I haven’t made this recipe since I posted that recipe back in 2011 (what?!) so I think it’s time to dust it off and see if it’s still blog-worthy. I’ll probably throw an easy salad together on the side, though sometimes when I’m feeling particularly lazy, I go for some chopped, raw carrots. If you’re feeling more adventurous, try this homemade sauerkraut!

wednesday. friday. saturday. sunday.
leftovers, take-out/restaurants, or Liam will be cooking – but if you need some more ideas, check these out:
vegetarian pot pies with feta-scallion biscuits, which I’ve made and loved but find the recipe to make more biscuits than filling.
early spring asparagus spaghetti squash casserole with roasted carrot + avocado salad
crispy baked tofu fingers with homemade ketchup, cauliflower tater tots, and steamed or roasted green beans.
vegan blt with optional fried egg and recommended side of kale chips

HAVE A GREAT WEEK, EVERYONE!

work-life balance? via @floptimism

It’s time for another blog-specific love fest! I came out from the rock under which I have been living and joined the many, many people already in love with the blog, Sprouted Kitchen. Think: mostly vegetarian, often vegan recipes bursting with fresh, whole foods. I bookmarked a good chunk of recipes, and ogled even more. Here are some of my favorites! To make your ogling that much easier.

[ source ]

[ source ]

cilantro pepita pesto
broccolini + charred lemon flatbread
veggie naan’wich, from scratch
multigrain waffles
black bean bowls with poached eggs
vegetable eggs benedict
brown rice crispy treats
oat ‘nana pucks
flourless chocolate date cake
mushroom burgers with asian slaw
greeny salad with crispy chickpeas + roasted jalapeno dressing
butternut salad with cider dressing
spiced sweet potatoes + chickpeas [<-- my two favorite foods ever! + cinnamon...I've also definitely already made this and love, love, love it.]

Last week, I was pretty sure I was in over my head with my meal plan, but it actually wound up working out just fine! Sometimes I think the thought of cooking so much from scratch is more daunting than the reality of it – we psych ourselves out. This week, I’m hoping the light cooperates and I can get a few recipes photographed to bring to you for the Spring.

[ source ]

[ source ]

monday.
[whole grain] ravioli with apples + walnuts, plus a whole mess of baby arugula + peas because…vegetables.

tuesday.
kind of this baked fontina dip, since I’ll have some cheese leftover from last meal plan’s pizza…except I’m planning to bulk up the smaller amount of cheese with some pureed + steamed cauliflower [and maybe white beans?] and use lots of fresh veggies for dipping…maybe some bread for Liam. TBD on whether that will be homemade.

prep ahead: I’m planning to steam the cauliflower, then puree it with everything but the cheese and possibly some white beans or chickpeas, adding olive oil, plain yogurt, or milk to get it to blend as needed, all of which could be done in advance; then, I’m going to mix it with freshly grated fontina and possibly cheddar (whatever I have leftover), which could also be prepped ahead…leave the baking for just before serving.

[ source ]

[ source ]

wednesday.
salmon + kale salad with, I think, some simple fresh citrus segments on the side, and possibly some leftover bread from Tuesday for Liam.

prep ahead: the recipe says you can cook the salmon in advance; everything else should come together quickly enough that it doesn’t matter.

sunday.
asparagus soup [coming to a floptimism near you this Spring!] paired with this grain-free focaccia, but you could also do a grilled cheese or some kind of grilled chicken sandwich if you prefer.

prep ahead: I’ll be doing everything that day, but the focaccia will take a while so you could always get a head start on that.

[ source ]

[ source ]

thursday. friday. saturday.
leftovers, take-out/restaurants, or Liam will be cooking – but if you need some more ideas, check these out:
roasted nourish bowl with…any veggies that call to you!
shepherd’s pie stuffed potatoes – did you catch my latest recipe last week?
vegan caesar lettuce wraps, with quinoa, kale, and tofu…or you could do chicken!

HAVE A GREAT WEEK, EVERYONE!

work-life balance? via @floptimism

shepherd's pie stuffed potatoes 1z via @floptimism

I started Floptimism when I started cooking. I had literally just switched majors to nutrition and knew a grand total of two things about a healthy diet, I’m pretty sure. So now, as I go back and cook my way through my own blog, slowly but surely, I start to realize that most of the recipes are no longer relevant. There’s absolutely a certain beauty to seeing my evolution fanned out in front of me. It reminds me of my clients, who stand before me as I stood six years ago, knowing that food was powerful but not quite understanding how or why; we don’t change overnight. I didn’t change overnight, with the early recipes of Floptimism being proof of that.

The trouble is that, when the vast majority of recipes on my blog no longer represent the advice I give or the way I choose to eat now, you’re at the disadvantage — you can’t just look back at any post and feel confident that it’s in line with my message as a health professional, and that’s not cool. So 2016 is the year of getting some ducks in a row, of brainstorming and re-imagining and setting into motion changes that have been a long time coming. It’s also the year where I try to remake some of my very oldest posts and wind up with something entirely different from the original.

These stuffed potatoes are that.

shepherd's pie stuffed potatoes via @floptimism

The original recipe is actually not for potatoes at all, but for a turkey cutlet stuffed with spinach and boursin. In recreating it, I ran into a few…snags. There’s no such thing, as far as I can tell, as organic, pasture-raised boursin; and it took a trip back to Philadelphia to find the same attributes in a turkey cutlet, which made repeat recipe testing somewhat challenging. On top of that, I have come to loathe stuffed meats because they’re fussy and I always under-cook them. I considered scrapping the recipe altogether and moving on to one that better captured the kind of diet I prefer and often recommend, but then I had an idea.

shepherd's pie stuffed potatoes via @floptimism

I thought back to a recipe I grew up with. It was never really my favorite but is so heavily laced with nostalgia that I think I’ll always remember it in a positive light. We called it shepherd’s pie, though I learned much later it was anything but. It was ground beef (and, later, ground turkey), mixed with a red sauce and piled on top of mashed potatoes. It was humble. It was simple. It was not right for Floptimism, but it was the perfect stepping stone for this turkey recipe.

Out went the cutlets and in came some ground turkey; the mushrooms were chopped rather than sliced for an extra “meaty” texture. You could probably decrease the turkey even further. (And yes, to all you vegetarians out there, I definitely think you could get away with eliminating the meat altogether, though I haven’t tried it; I’d suggest a combination of extra mushrooms, lentils, and chopped walnuts.) I scrapped the boursin and peppered the dish instead with a stronger parmesan, so I could use less of it. And then there were the potatoes.

shepherd's pie stuffed potatoes via @floptimism

I also had this mashed potato recipe I had been toying with, and I liked it — at least as much as I could like mashed potatoes, which have never really been my thing. I’ve always preferred roasted potatoes, especially the skin, yet found the starchy inside a bit of a let-down. But what if I took the crispy skins I liked and filled them with a spruced-up, lemony mashed potato recipe before baking a second time, and using that as the bed for the sauce?

Let me tell you…it works. It works really well. It also reminds me a lot of the “shepherd’s pie” I grew up with, but with way more vegetables, fiber, and layers of flavor.

shepherd's pie stuffed potatoes via @floptimism

As I write this, it’s beautifully sunny out and difficult to imagine another cold, winter evening where a dish like this is both necessary and welcome. I feel like it’s April, and we should be talking about salads endlessly, but I know there’s more winter left before Spring is here for good, so keep this recipe handy. We aren’t likely out of the clear yet, and these “shepherd’s pie” stuffed potatoes can help us get through it.

one year ago: 28 days to happiness, final thoughts
two years ago: unplugged
three years ago: strawberry-cantaloupe breakfast ‘sorbet’
[ no post four years ago ]
five years ago: quick, colorful chicken + veggie skillet
six years ago: rosemary-balsamic chicken with balsamic ravioli, which I’ve since revamped

shepherd’s pie stuffed potatoes.

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour, 10 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 15 minutes

Yield: 4-6 servings

this is a riff on a meat-and-potatoes dinner I had as a child and always called, falsely, shepherd's pie; here, I've added more fiber, flavor, and - of course - vegetables, yet it is every bit as nostalgic.

Ingredients

    for the potatoes:
  • 4-6 tiny or 2-3 large baking potatoes
  • 3 tablespoons plain, Greek yogurt
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • freshly ground black pepper and sea salt, to taste
  • for the meat + veggie sauce:
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 pound ground turkey
  • 1 medium yellow onion, diced
  • 1/2 pound cremini mushrooms, minced
  • 14-15 ounces no-salt-added crushed tomatoes
  • 4 large handfuls (up to 8 cups) baby arugula, washed
  • freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 3 tablespoons freshly grated parmesan cheese

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees fahrenheit and prick holes in the potatoes. Bake them directly on the rack for 45 minutes to 1 hour. Remove the potatoes, slice in half, and set aside to cool enough to handle.
  2. Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat and add the diced onion, sauteing until lightly browned, 3-5 minutes. Stir in the garlic and cook an addition few minutes, careful not to burn it.
  3. Add the ground turkey to the pan and saute, breaking up as it cooks. Once the turkey is mostly cooked (about 5 minutes), add the mushrooms, followed by the crushed tomatoes. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer until you're ready to serve.
  4. Return to the potatoes you had set aside. Preheat the broiler of your oven and line a small baking sheet with foil. Scoop out the insides into a bowl and mix with the yogurt, half of the lemon zest, the remaining tablespoon of olive oil, and some freshly ground black pepper. Taste and add the remaining lemon zest if desired (I do, but it makes it quite lemony). Stuff back into the potato skins, garnish with a dash of sea salt, and arrange on the prepared sheet. Place under the broiler until lightly browned on top, 5-7 minutes. (Check on it frequently; broilers like to take food from perfect to charred in an instant.)
  5. While the potatoes broil, add the arugula to the meat and veggie sauce and season with black pepper. Stir in the parmesan and turn the heat down to low until the potatoes are finished.
  6. Serve 1-2 potato halves per person, depending on the size, with a large spoonful of the sauce on top.

Notes

sources, adapted: cuisine recipes [the potatoes], turkey recipe loosely inspired by rachael ray

note: for a leaner product, choose 99% lean ground turkey breast over standard ground turkey; I keep meat portions so small, though, and can never find the leaner option from pasture-raised sources, so I often stick to the standard ground.

http://www.floptimism.com/shepherds-pie-stuffed-potatoes/

I may have chosen some slightly ambitious recipes this week, mostly in the amount of prep work on various days when I not be around as much as I would hope. Usually, though, I find that it works out — even if a recipe winds up not being exactly as I had envisioned it (or even remotely recognizable), so I try not to stress over it too much. Just go with it — come up with a plan, for sure, but if you have to improvise a little, no big deal. You might even create something better than the original!

source ]

[ source ]

monday.
quinoa salad with roasted sweet potatoes, kale, and dried cranberries, an all-time favorite of mine! I turn it into a meal by adding beans (chickpeas usually; non-vegetarians can try cooked chicken or salmon) and a hefty handful of sunflower seeds (almonds, pumpkin seeds, or pecans would also be lovely).

prep ahead: this keeps pretty well as a whole for a day or so; you could certainly prep the individual components a day in advance and warm/combine that evening. I’ve even read you can freeze cooked quinoa, though I’ve never done it myself.

tuesday.
roasted sweet potatoes + chickpeas with chili lime spiced almonds and a chopped kale salad with creamy almond-ginger dressing, like a hodge-podge of things.

prep ahead: I’ll be cooking the chickpeas from dried on Monday, but otherwise plan to do it all on Tuesday evening; you could likely make the almonds and salad in advance (kale salads tend to improve with a bit of mellowing in the fridge).

[ source ]

[ source ]

wednesday.
pulled chicken (based on this how sweet it is pulled pork recipe) and black bean burrito bowls, made with cauliflower rice, frozen corn, cilantro, avocado, greens, and salsa.

prep ahead: I will be making the pulled chicken the day before; make sure you have canned beans or they’re already cooked, otherwise you will need to cook those up ahead, too. The salsa and cauliflower rice call also be prepped ahead, so all you have to do is heat and assemble if you’re really going to be pressed for time.

for vegetarians / vegans: omit the chicken and add extra beans or seared/roasted tofu, seasoned with some of the spices from the pulled pork (chicken for me) recipe.

sunday.
pulled chicken pizza with maple leeks, roasted garlic, and aged cheddar, though the original recipe calls for pork — I have too much trouble finding a good, humanely raised (“pen free”) pork around here, so I’m going to try it with chicken instead. There will be a very large pile of greens on my plate as well!

prep ahead: if you want to try a different dough recipe, this one is my go-to and can be made days in advance, further even if you freeze it; the pulled meat you’ll want to make ahead (like I said above, I’ll be making it earlier in the week for a different recipe), along with the roasted garlic.

for vegetarians / vegans: I’m sure this would taste just fine without the shredded meat altogether, though you could use the same marinade ingredients for chopped tempeh or mushrooms for an extra shot of flavor; vegans may want to try a different recipe altogether, like this vegan pesto pizza.

[ source ]

[ source ]

thursday. friday. saturday.
leftovers, take-out/restaurants, or Liam will be cooking – but if you need some more ideas, check these out:
kale, chickpea, and minestrone soup paired with a nice side salad if you like; if you can’t find a bean-based pasta and aren’t gluten intolerant, go for a simple whole wheat instead.
lentil-farro veggie loaf, one more time before the cold weather ends!
cornmeal waffles, which would be equally great with roasted veggies and a poached egg as they would with oven-fried chicken and sauteed greens.

HAVE A GREAT WEEK, EVERYONE!

work-life balance? via @floptimism

A photo posted by Jessica (@floptimism) on

bookmark love.
vegetable flatbreads!
chickpea smoothie bowl (like I need more excuses to eat chickpeas)
vegan chocolate hazelnut crepes – ahh, the elusive egg-less crepe; of course Izzy from Top with Cinnamon would solve this mystery for me!
forbidden rice breakfast porridge
toasted quinoa cashew butter cups
mocha coconut protein bars

just…love, love.
the miraculous benefits of coconut oil [the new yorker]
how to be human, a look at love and ourselves [the verge]
why fruits and vegetables taste better in Europe, though to be fair, on the point of seasonality, I also recently read a very interesting counterpiece on why local + seasonal may in fact not be the end-all and be-all of produce picking [vox]
a hummus hack because forreal, storebought hummus is nothing like one freshly made [dinner a love story]
try a tiny kitchen [the washington post]
the stigma of doing things alone [huffington post]
how I became a morning person, read more books, and learned a language in a year [fast company]

This week may just top out at the weirdest set up for home-cooked meals ever. Between being summoned for jury duty for the first time ever, and having some late-night events for work tacked onto that, attempting even three meals may be a challenge…but I’m going to make it happen. I’ve been pulling a lot of late nights at work lately, which is why you’re seeing a major dip in the quantity of meals here, but hopefully my extra ideas at the end of the post will help you out if you have a more normal schedule than mine. One thing that does help me is to take some time early in the morning to cook up a soup or casserole that I can either bring to work with me or heat up quickly when I get home. If it weren’t for that, these posts would absolutely become a run-down of all the different take-out restaurants to which I was resorting out of sheer desperation. Planning…it makes all the difference, I promise.

[ source ]

[ source ]

monday.
tarragon + pea puree [sans puff pastry] with roasted potatoes and extra veggies…probably carrots and beets, but I’ll see what looks best at the market.

wednesday.
creamy avocado pasta with tuna, and a big pile of steamed broccoli added for good measure.

for vegetarians / vegans: omit the tuna, and you still have a protein-packed dish with the cottage cheese; vegans, you can use a bean-based pasta for protein and omit both the tuna and cottage cheese, though you may want to increase the avocado to make sure you have enough sauce.

friday.
warm grain bowl with roasted cauliflower + spicy chicken.

for vegetarians / vegans: swap the chicken out for some roasted chickpeas or sauteed tofu/temepeh, and if vegan, use a little nutritional yeast over the parmesan cheese.

prep ahead: you could easily make the quinoa a day or two in advance, and honestly, it says leftovers for the entire dish keep well so you could even make the entire thing to reheat a day later. I’m planning to make it all that evening.

[ source ]

[ source ]

tuesday. friday. saturday. sunday.
leftovers, take-out/restaurants, or Liam will be cooking – but if you need some more ideas, check these out:
mushroom burgers with asian slaw paired with a big salad or steamed/roasted veggies on the side.
tex-mex eggs benedict.
moroccan style vegetable + chickpea stew.
pulled pork [or chicken!] pizza with maple leeks + aged cheddar with, you guessed it, a heap ton of veggies on the side!

HAVE A GREAT WEEK, EVERYONE!

work-life balance? via @floptimism

Happy Valentine’s Day! We’re keeping it super low-key around these parts, though there is definitely a bit of healthified chocolate cupcakery that’s going to happen before the day is done. Think: chocolate avocado frosting and a cake recipe that uses oat flour (tried buckwheat last time and it tasted quite buckwheaty indeed), almond pulp (because I’m in desperate need of recipes that utilize the leftovers from my homemade almond milk), and some fair-trade cocoa + chocolate (this one is my absolute favorite). BUT! A girl cannot live on chocolate alone — eventually, though it may seem hard to believe, she’s gonna crave some veg. So before we get to the dessert, let’s talk dinner!

[ source ]

[ source ]

monday.
leek and potato soup

wednesday.
Indian spiced cabbage and peas with Indian spiced chicken using freekeh, farro, or lentils instead of white rice…and definitely cooking the chicken stove-top versus on my non-existent grill.

for vegetarians / vegans: mix a hefty handful of roasted chickpeas into the mix, or if you eat eggs, try a nice shakshuka instead of the chicken recipe.

friday.
chipotle veggie & bean burritos, possibly with homemade tortillas if the week goes well.

How to Cook Dried Beans via @Floptimism

prep ahead: I’m planning to make the tortillas on Thursday; I should have enough black beans in the freezer but if you’re not using canned, you might want to cook up some dried beans earlier in the week.

tuesday. thursday. saturday. sunday.
leftovers, take-out/restaurants, or Liam will be cooking – but if you need some more ideas, check these out:
wasabi salmon with bok choy, cabbage, and shiitakes paired with some wild rice, quinoa, farro, or other whole grain on the side.
lemon dijon tofu and potatoes with a big grab of greens and maybe some steamed or roasted broccoli, too.
pink grapefruit and avocado salad with halibut and roasted beets, perhaps?
spicy tempeh empanadas with some black bean soup.

HAVE A GREAT WEEK, EVERYONE!

work-life balance? via @floptimism

lentil veggie loaf via @floptimism ocean

I know, I know. “Veggie loaf” sounds about as unappetizing as unappetizing gets, but I’ve spent about as long thinking about alternate names for this recipe as I’ve spent making it…and it’s about time I quit thinking and start sharing. Ashley over at Edible Perspective first posted a version of this in 2014, based on a recipe originally shared by Angela of Oh She Glows fame in 2012. Now, these women know their way around a plant-based kitchen, and you’d be in good hands to follow their recipes to a T. But after a couple years of making this in my own little space, I’ve developed my own take on it and love it so much, it’s time I tell you about it, too.

lentil veggie loaf via @floptimism ocean

I probably should have done this months ago. This lentil veggie loaf has a very late-Fall feel to it, the kind of meal that has totally usurped the dried out turkey in the Thanksgiving feast of my dreams, but since I apparently know nothing of timeliness and, in fact, just finished sharing a “late late” harvest nourish bowl with you last month, well…Fall in February shouldn’t come as much of a surprise. Besides, who wouldn’t want a piping hot slice of this beauty to warm them up in the dead of winter?

lentil veggie loaf via @floptimism ocean

I always, always serve this with extra root vegetables, roasted to perfection with just enough salt, pepper, and oil to elevate their natural flavors — Brussels sprouts, sweet potatoes, perhaps a butternut squash, and a few big handfuls of kale are always safe bets. They add color, and there’s never such a thing as too many vegetables. The loaf itself is soft, but maintains the perfect amount of textural chew from the walnuts and lentils. I’ll bet sunflower seeds would be equally tasty for anyone with nut allergies. It has a touch of sweetness in the glaze, which I tried once to switch up for a mustard concoction and immediately regretted, because it balances out the savory veggies in the loaf itself. I could seriously live on this one recipe alone from October through March, though I think I would get one or two grumbles from Liam. Something about wanting variety, and also some meat now and again? Whatever.

lentil veggie loaf via @floptimism

Some other pluses? It freezes well. You can make it ahead of time. It’s pretty versatile, so you can change up the grains and even the veggies a bit. I’ve made it vegan with flax eggs, and though it works for the most part, it is slightly more prone to falling apart without the actual eggs, so consider yourself warned. (This may or may not have made for a dramatic fiasco when trying to transfer it to the platter for the photo shoot the most recent time I made it.)

I think my kitchen escapades could make for a fairly successful sitcom.

lentil veggie loaf via @floptimism

 

lentil rice veggie loaf.

Prep Time: 40 minutes

Cook Time: 45 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 25 minutes

Yield: 6-8 servings

This vegan riff on the classic meatloaf is hearty, satisfying, and the only thing I want to eat from October through March.

Ingredients

    for the lentil veggie loaf:
  • 2 tablespoons ground flax
  • 6 tablespoons water
  • 2/3 cup French green lentils
  • 2 cups low-sodium vegetable broth
  • 1/3 cup farro
  • 1 cup chopped walnuts
  • 2 teaspoons avocado oil
  • 1 small onion
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 cup grated sweet potato (about 1/2 medium)
  • 8 ounces cremini mushrooms, minced
  • 2 cups loosely packed, chopped curly kale
  • 1/2 cup oats
  • 1/2 cup white whole wheat or almond pulp/meal
  • salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • for the glaze:
  • 1/4 cup organic ketchup
  • 1 teaspoon pure maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon hot sauce
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

Instructions

  1. Whisk together the flax and water in a small bowl and set aside in the refrigerator to thicken.
  2. Bring the lentils and broth to a boil in a medium sauce pot over high heat, then reduce to a simmer. Stir every few minutes for about 25 minutes, then add in the farro and cook an additional 15 minutes until the liquid is absorbed and the farro and lentils are both tender.
  3. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 300 degrees Fahrenheit and arrange the walnuts in an even layer on a baking sheet. Toast in the preheated oven, shaking the pan occasionally and watching like a hawk, until fragrant and lightly golden. Careful - it's easy to burn them! Remove from the oven and raise the oven temperature to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  4. Heat the oil in a large saute pan over medium heat and chop up the onion. Add to the pan and saute 6-8 minutes. Mince the garlic and toss that into the pan too, followed by the grated sweet potato for about 5 minutes. Stir in the mushrooms and kale, cooking until the greens have just wilted, 2-3 minutes.
  5. Line an extra-large loaf pan (or two standard-sized pans, or a bunch of smaller ones, or...) on all sides with parchment. Set aside.
  6. Whisk together the glaze ingredients. Set that aside, too.
  7. Back to the veggie loaf! Add the walnuts, oats, and half of the lentil-farro mixture into a food processor (I use my vitamix) and pulse until finely chopped but not pureed. Add to the pan of veggies along with the rest of the lentil-farro mixture, flour, salt, pepper, and a few tablespoons of the glaze (you can alternatively use pretty much any other sauce you have on hand: I've used leftover enchilada sauce and worcestershire on separate occasions with success). Taste and adjust seasonings as necessary, but remember, the glaze will add more flavor to the end recipe. Finally, stir in the flax mixture from the fridge.
  8. Transfer the mixture to the prepared pan(s) and press firmly, smoothing out the top a bit. Spread the glaze over the top and bake in the preheated oven until the glaze has darkened and the edges begin to brown, 40-45 minutes for the largest pan size. (Smaller pans may take less time).
  9. Let the loaf cool in the pan for 15 minutes before removing and attempting to slice, and when you do, do so quite carefully.
  10. Serve alongside extra roasted veggies or a hearty kale salad.

Notes

source, adapted: edible perspective

notes:

(1) you can use 2 eggs instead of the flax and water mixture; obviously skip the soaking-in-the-fridge step and just add the whole eggs right to the veggie mixture after you season with salt, pepper, and the few tablespoons of sauce.

(2) to freeze, cool completely, slice into smaller portions, and wrap tightly in foil; I reheat by thawing completely and either microwaving (at work, not as ideal) or in a toaster oven until warmed through.

http://www.floptimism.com/lentil-farro-veggie-loaf/

A photo posted by Jessica (@floptimism) on

bookmark love.
seven spice chickpea stew
quinoa with chai-spiced almond milk
vegan chai cheesecake with earl grey fig sauce.

kitchen love.
blood orange, cranberry, + pistachio oatmeal makes a wonderful winter breakfast when topped with extra pistachios, cacao nibs, chia seeds, and unsweetened coconut flakes.

just…love, love.
why you shouldn’t throw away cauliflower leaves [the kitchn]